Finished Books: The Improbability of Love

The Improbability of Love by Hannah Rothschild

  • Published: 2015
  • Pages: 408

Link to Goodreads summaryThe Improbability of Love

Winner of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction in 2016, this novel is full of rich descriptions without feeling pretentious.  Rothschild paints a portrait of a wide range of characters, giving many of them depth and meaning, despite how big or small their role in the novel is.  The painting, The Improbability of Love, has her own voice every few chapters, slowly revealing her history while also commenting on her current existence with a new owner.  It is a book that encourages the reader to research other paintings or artists.  

One of the main points of interest that emerges in this novel is the lost and stolen artwork during World War II.  For readers who want to know more about that time period and the men who tried to save the world’s great art, try The Monuments Men by Robert M. Edsel with Bret Witter.

Rating: 3 stars

Finished Books: Another Quick Recap

Book Covers-Another Quick Recap

Screwdrivered by Alice Clayton

  • Published: 2014
  • Pages: 476 (digital)
  • Series: Cocktail series #3

Link to Goodreads summary

Although the third in a series, knowledge of the previous two books does not seem necessary to enjoy this light-hearted, steamy romance. Viv, who is a romantic at heart, inherits a large, dilapidated home in California. As she tries to figure out what to do with the house, and her life, she must also make decisions of the heart between the two men who are constantly at her house: the man who takes care of the horses and the librarian who thwarts her every attempt to update the historical home.

Rating: 3 stars


Mr. Kiss and Tell by Rob Thomas & Jennifer Graham

  • Published: 2015
  • Pages: (336)
  • Audio length: 10 hours, 8 minutes
  • Narrator: Rebecca Lowman
  • Series: Veronica Mars #2

Link to Goodreads summary

Veronica Mars continues to use her sassy cunning to discover whodunnit in the second in the series. In the audio, the narrator (Rebecca Lowman, not Kristen Bell), is noticeable primarily because any fan of the show is used to hearing Kristen Bell telling the story. Lowman does a fine job distinguishing characters and creating a sense of foreboding as the story intensified.

Rating: 3 stars


Die Easy by Zoë Sharp

  • Published: 2013
  • Pages: (400)
  • Audio length: 10 hours, 46 minutes
  • Narrator: Justine Eyre
  • Series: Charlie Fox series #11

Link to Goodreads summary

Charlie Fox, a professional bodyguard for wealthy clients, must work with her ex-boyfriend, whose recent memory loss makes her question his abilities on the job. An action-packed story full of adventure and peril, the author draws you into the story and does not give up until the conclusion. A good choice for fans of adventure movies.

Rating: 3 stars


Cure for the Common Breakup by Beth Kendrick

  • Published: 2014
  • Pages: 336

Link to Goodreads summary

Summer Benson’s life shifts dramatically when her plane crashes, she is hospitalized, and her boyfriend (the pilot of the plane) breaks up with her instead of proposes to her.  To work out her unexpected grief, Summer goes to Black Dog Bay, a town built upon the tourism of recovering from a breakup.  The larger-than-life characters of the town, the witty writing style, and the chemistry between Summer and the town’s mayor, Dutch, make for a lively, upbeat novel.

Rating: 3 stars


Vanishing Act by Thomas Perry

  • Published: 2009
  • Pages: (289)
  • Audio length: 10 hours, 4 minutes
  • Narrator: Joyce Bean
  • Series: Jane Whitefield #1

Link to Goodreads summary

Jane Whitefield makes her living by making people disappear.  She doesn’t kill them; she helps them start over somewhere else under a different name and existence.  Her most recent client, John Felker, knows of Jane from a mutual acquaintance, Harry Kemple, who ends up dead shortly after John relocates.  Thomas Perry weaves Native American lore into his story, giving the reader a history/culture lesson along the way.  These breaks from the narrative only mildly detract from the otherwise nonstop action as Jane tries to find out who killed Harry and fight her feelings for John.

Rating: 2 stars

Finished Books: The Light We Lost

The Light We Lost by Jill Santopolo

  • Published: 2017
  • Pages: 336 e-ARC

Link to Goodreads summary

32956365When considering to whom you should recommend this book, one important aspect to know about this story is that it is told from the point of view of the main female character (Lucy) telling the story to the main male character (Gabe) (“You and I…”  “You were…” etc.).  Some readers do not want a story told in this manner, and so you should probably make sure they know about it.  HOWEVER, if your reader has an open mind, after a small adjustment of mind-frame when reading, it is easy to get used to the storytelling style.  

This book is definitely character-driven.  At its heart, this is a book about relationships, but it is also a love story.  It shows the reader many aspects of love: the beginning where everything is new and exciting; the loss when it all falls apart; the grieving period where you can’t cope with any new affection; the mundanity of everyday love; the frustration of differing opinions and desires within a relationship.  Some novels only cover one or two aspects: the break-up and/or the new love.  It’s nice to see it all covered.  Their story starts at the beginning and Lucy highlights events in their lives, sharing slivers of time and what was going on during that time.

For someone who likes the aspects of telling a story of a relationship in snippets over the course of many years, you might suggest One Day by David Nicholls.

Rating: 3 stars (“liked it”)

*I received an advanced copy of this book from the publisher. A positive review was not required.*

 

Finished Books: Quick Recap

Ah, those times when life gets in the way and all you want to do is curl up with a comforting book rather than write any reviews about them.  Does that only happen to me?  Oh, well.

Here are a few quick reviews of some of the books I have finished recently (if by recently you accept anytime within the past month).  They are very brief reviews that will mainly give you a quick view of some appeal factors that might help you determine if this book is right for a certain reader.

Books Quick Review #1


Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough

  • Published: 2017
  • Pages: 306

Link to Goodreads summary

A domestic suspense novel with unreliable narrators.  Told from multiple points of view in two different time periods (one is the past version of one of the main characters).  Reader will need to be able to suspend disbelief for some elements of this story, particularly in the end.


The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin

  • Published: 2015
  • Pages: 500
  • Audio length: ~15 ½ hours
  • Narrator: Robin Miles
  • Series: The Broken Earth #1

Link to Goodreads summary

A genre-blending novel that walks the line between fantasy and science fiction.  Follows plotlines for multiple characters.  The world-building is slow and develops over the course of the entire book, leaving the reader confused at times due to unfamiliarity with the mechanics of the world.  Good narration; nice to listen to the names and places rather than struggling to determine pronunciation for the written words.


Good in Bed by Jennifer Weiner

  • Published: 2001
  • Pages: (376)
  • Audio: 5 hours, 45 minutes (Abridged)
  • Narrator: Paula Cale
  • Series: Cannie Shapiro #1

Link to Goodreads summary

A nice, light book that explores themes beyond the main character solely searching for the love of her life.  The audio book had a narrator who paced the narration well with the character’s emotions.  There wasn’t a lot of difference between the narrator’s characters, but overall it was easy to determine who was speaking.


Veronica Mars: The Thousand Dollar Tan Line by Rob Thomas and Jennifer Graham

  • Published: 2014
  • Pages: 324
  • Audio: 8 hours, 43 minutes
  • Narrator: Kristen Bell
  • Series: Veronica Mars #1

Link to Goodreads summary

With Kristen Bell as the narrator, this audiobook felt just like an episode of Veronica Mars.  Bell created distinct characters in her narration, using accents as necessary to portray different people.  The book seemed like it would work well even for a reader who was not familiar with the television show.  However, there were references to plotlines from the show and the movie that would help delineate distinctive aspects of the characters in their current roles.  This book is great for fans of private investigator procedural books with snarky dialogue.


Britt-Marie was Here by Fredrik Backman

  • Published: 2014
  • Pages: 498 (Large Print)

Link to Goodreads summary

Another fantastic character-driven book full of eccentric, quirky characters.  An adult coming-of-age story.  Open-ended and hopeful.  Backman really writes stories about real people with real struggles and makes you want their stories to continue far beyond the scope of his novels.


That’s all, folks!  Happy reading!


Edited to add: You can see how on top of things I am since I included a review of an audiobook I have already reviewed on this blog.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Reading Resolutions for 2014

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week, participating bloggers respond to the given topic with their own top 10 list.  I participate as time allows and as the theme appeals to me.

Running a little late on this one today.  Good thing none of my resolutions have to do with doing things on time.

I’m not that big on making resolutions.  However, I already have several goals in mind for what/how I want to read this year.  All of the goals kind of mingle together, with the general theme being that I want to become more familiar with common authors and genres.

Multiple books by different authors in different genres

A sampling of many different books
Photo CC by Joe Shlabotnik

The ultimate goal is to improve my skills as a future readers’ advisor librarian.  Reading across the board is just the first step.

  1. Read (in general).  When I was younger I used to read all the time.  You would rarely find me without a book.  Entering adulthood, I was overwhelmed with other responsibilities (mostly involving choices that make it seem like I have been in school eternally).  I turned to other methods of decompressing.  As I near graduation, though, I want to return to enjoying reading as a hobby.
  2. Read outside my comfort zone.  I know the authors and genres of books that will be an easy, entertaining read for me, without too much brain power.  These books have fulfilled a need: rest, relax, don’t think too hard (usually after a semester has ended).  But I want to expand my reading selections.  I want to discover new authors and was recently surprised by a book outside my typical genre choices.
  3. Complete the Literary Exploration Challenge.  To complement the previous goal, I want to read from a variety of genres.  Following the Literary Exploration Challenge, I am going to attempt the Insane Challenge to explore a multitude of new books.  I may even throw in aspects from a couple of other reading challenges I have seen, such as choosing a book that meets a certain theme or whose title includes a certain keyword.
  4. Read 50 books.  That number is a little intimidating to me, but I do not think it is unachievable (particularly if I complete the Reading Challenge).  In fact, I hope to read more than that, but I want to aim for some number.  I have seen people participating in the Goodreads challenges in the past.  This year I have pledged my number.  Apparently Goodreads will tell you when you are falling behind (or so I’ve heard; I have yet to experience the “friendly reminder”).
  5. Read new books.  This probably seems ridiculous for most people who keep up-to-date with all the new books.  Honestly, because I have been so removed from most books for what feels like so long, I would not feel comfortable talking to people about books, particularly new books.  If I was to go through the “Must-read” and “Best of” lists from the last, oh… 10 years, the number of “Read” books would be very, very low.
  6. Catch up on old books.   There are household names whose books I never read.  One of my goals this year is to fit some of those books and some of those authors into my reading.
  7. Learn to write book reviews/annotations.  Many of the reviews I read seem to contain the majority of the book review clichés contained in this Examiner article (thanks to Molly at wrapped up in books for sharing this).  I need to find examples of good reviewers and learn what works and what does not work.
  8. Learn appeal factors and what makes a good read-alike.  I follow Becky over at RA for All and plan to use the categories from the reviews on her students’ blog as a guideline for information to include in my practice reviews.  I also love the way Becky chooses books as read-alikes.  She does not just use the theme of the book or the genre (which is an easy trap to fall into), but rather the tone, pace, setting, etc.
  9. Learn to speed read/skim books.  These books will not be included in my total of actual books read for the year.  This will just be an exercise as a method of becoming familiar with more books and authors very quickly, learning the writing style, pacing, and basic format.  There is certainly no replacement for actually reading a book, but there is also no way to read every book ever written.
  10. Don’t stress out about not completing any of the above. I do not need to be perfect.  I do not need to achieve everything.  I have a lot of other hobbies and still at least one semester left of graduate school.  I need to make sure I give myself a break.

What are your goals for reading this year?  If you met your goals last year, share them in the comments.

Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Books I would recommend to Aunt Judy

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week, participating bloggers respond to the given topic with their own top 10 list.  I participate as time allows and as the theme appeals to me.

My aunt Judy is the reason I started reading any sort of murder-mysteries or thrillers.  One holiday weekend when I was visiting, we were headed to the beach and I had nothing to read, so I grabbed Sue Grafton’s A is for Alibi off her shelf.

I have since found out from speaking to her that she really enjoys crime and mystery novels that have strong women protagonists.  She also tends to read a lot of books in series.  I know for a fact she enjoys Sue Grafton, Janet Evanovich, Kathy Reichs, and Tess Gerritsen.

For today’s top 10, I have come up with 10 crime or mystery series featuring women protagonists that I think aunt Judy should try.

Pictures of five covers of the first books in the series

  1. Inspector Lynley series by Elizabeth George – One of the main characters is Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers who, along with Detective Inspector Thomas “Tommy” Lynley investigate crimes.
  2. … in Death series by J. D. Robb – Although I am not sure the future setting of this will necessarily appeal to her, I think that aunt Judy would at least give the book a try.  If the writing and stories are satisfactory, I think she is able to get past futuristic settings when reading.
  3. Women’s Murder Club series by James Patterson – Featuring four leading ladies of different professions, this series is likely to intrigue her.
  4. Joanna Brady series by J. A. Jance – I’m not entirely sure how she’ll feel about the Arizona setting, it may not affect her at all.  Again, if the story is compelling, I don’t think setting is an issue.
  5. Kay Scarpetta series by Patricia Cornwell – Reminiscent of Tess Gerritsen’s Rizzoli and Isles books, or even Kathy Reichs’s Temperence Brennan books, Dr. Kay Scarpetta sounds like a character that would fit in well with what aunt Judy already reads.Pictures of 5 more titles I would recommend to my aunt
  6. Charlotte McNally series by Hank Phillippi Ryan – She seems to go for more traditionally police or doctor-detective type characters, but I think she would be willing to at least try a book about a TV investigative reporter trying to solve crimes.
  7. Jessie Drake series by Rochelle Krich – Another female detective investigating murders that she probably has not read yet.
  8. Irene Kelly Mystery series by Jan Burke – Based in Southern California, much like the Kinsey Milhone books by Sue Grafton, a reporter uncovers secrets as she digs for the truth behind mysteries.
  9. Cordelia Gray series by P. D. James – There are only two books in this series, but I think the character would be one that aunt Judy would really enjoy: a newly-minted private investigator.
  10. Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes series by Laurie R. King – The leading female character in this might be a bit young (15 years old) compared to what she normally reads, but, again, I think she is willing to give most books a shot.  I like the Sherlock Holmes aspect of the book, but it would be interesting to see what aunt Judy’s reaction to it would be.

There you have it.  Ten book series I think my aunt Judy should read.  They won’t really expand outside her preferred genre, and that’s okay.  There certainly are plenty of lead female characters to choose from in the murder-mystery arena.

Top Ten Tuesday #2

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish. Each week, participating bloggers respond to the given topic with their own top 10 list.  In case I haven’t mentioned it before, I will participate sporadically, and hopefully more often once I am able to begin reading more regularly again.

This week’s theme is Top Ten Sequels I Cannot Wait to Get My Hands On.  I know that many people will be writing about all the new sequels that are coming out soon or that just recently came out.  Considering I do not get a chance to read as much as I would like, many of the sequels I would like to read are already out (and have been for a while!), or I haven’t even had a chance to start the series yet.  So this week, I am adapting the theme to be the

Top Ten Sequels/Series I Still Need to Read

The first five list items are books where I have read the first book but need to finish the series.

Pictures of the Titles from Veronica Roth, Ally Condie, and Stieg Larsson that I have not yet read

1. Insurgent and Allegiant by Veronica Roth

2. Crossed and Reached by Ally Condie

3. The Girl Who Played with Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson

Pictures of the covers from the Amulet and Good Thief's Guide Series

4. Amulet Books 2-5 by Kazu Kibuishi

5. The Good Thief’s Guide to… Paris, Vegas, Venice, and Berlin  by Chris Ewan

The last five list items are books where I have heard really good things about a series but have not yet been able to read any of the books in the series.

Pictures of the covers of the first book in each series I have not yet read

6. Terry Pratchett’s Discworld Series

7. Cassandra Clare’s The Mortal Instruments Series

8. Debora Geary’s A Modern Witch Series

9. Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files Series

10. George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire Series

Well, now you all know how very far behind I am in reading. 🙂